WhatName

Names starting with Ea

Earnweald - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements earn "eagle" and weald "power, might," hence "eagle power." After the Norman invasion this name was replaced in England by German Arnwald.
Éadaoin - Variant spelling of Irish Éadan, meaning "face" or perhaps "against" or "opposite."
Eadgard - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Eádgár, meaning "rich spear." 
Ealdgyð -  Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements eald "old" and gy� "battle," hence "old battle."
Éamon - Irish Gaelic form of English Edmund, meaning "protector of prosperity."
Éamonn - Variant spelling of Irish Gaelic Éamon, meaning "protector of prosperity."
Earl -  Aristocratic title transferred to byname and finally to forename, from Old English eorl, meaning "nobleman, prince, warrior."
Eachthighearna - Gaelic name composed of the elements each "horse," and tighearna "lord, master," hence "lord of horses."
Eartha - Old English namemeaning "earth, ground."
Earnest - Variant spelling of English Ernest, meaning "battle (to the death), serious business."
Eason - English patronymic surname transferred to forename use, meaning "son of Eade." 
Ealasaid - Scottish Gaelic form of Greek Elisabet, meaning "God is my oath."
Eadmund - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements ead "fortune, prosperity, riches" and mund "protector," hence "protector of prosperity."
Eadbhárd - Irish Gaelic form of French Édouard, meaning "guardian of prosperity."
Eastmund - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements east "beauty, grace" and mund "protection," hence "gracious protector."
Ealisaid - Manx form of Greek Elisabet, meaning "God is my oath."
Eavan - Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Aoibheann, meaning "beautiful, fair form."
Eadwig - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements ead "fortune, riches, prosperity," and wig "strife, war," hence "prosperity war."
Eadwine - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements ead "fortune, rich, prosperity" and wine "friend, hence "rich friend."
Eadweard - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements ead "fortune, prosperity, riches," and weard "guard," hence "guardian of prosperity."
Eadburga - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements ead "fortune, riches, prosperity," and burg "fortress," hence "rich fortress."
Easter - English unisex name derived from the holiday name "Easter," which is related to Old English Eosturmónaþ/Eastermónaþ, meaning "April."
Eadhun - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements ead "fortune, prosperity, riches" and hún "a Hun," hence "rich Hun."
Éanna - Irish Gaelic name derived from the word éan, meaning "bird-like."
Ealdgyth - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Ealdgyð, meaning "old battle."
Éabha - Irish Gaelic form of Greek Eva, meaning "life."
Éadan - Variant form of Irish Étaín, meaning "face" or perhaps "against" or "opposite."
Eallair - Scottish contracted form of Gaelic Ceallair, meaning "superior of a church cell."
Earleen - Variant spelling of English Earline, meaning "nobleman, prince, warrior."
Eadric - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements ead "fortune, prosperity, riches," and ric "power, rule," hence "rich ruler."
Easun - Etruscan form of Greek Iason, meaning "to heal."
Earta - Albanian name meaning "the golden one."
Eanraig - Scottish Gaelic form of English Henry, meaning "home-ruler."
Ea - Akkadian form of Sumerian Enki, meaning either "lord of the earth" or "lord of the underworld." In Babylonian mythology, this is the name of a god of creation, wisdom, keeper of divine laws, and half-brother to Enlil. 
Eamhair - Scottish form of Gaelic Éimhear, possibly meaning "ready, swift." 
Eachann - Scottish Gaelic name composed of the elements each "horse" and donn "brown," hence "brown horse." Hector is an Anglicized form.
Eádgár - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the elements ead "fortune, prosperity, riches," and gar "spear," hence "rich spear." 
Earline - Feminine form of English Earl, meaning "nobleman, prince, warrior."
Earle - Variant spelling of English Earl, meaning "nobleman, prince, warrior."
Ean - Manx form of English John, meaning "God is gracious."
Earlene - Variant spelling of English Earline, meaning "nobleman, prince, warrior."
Eadgyð -  Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements ead "fortune, riches, prosperity" and gyð "strife," hence "rich battle." 
Eadred - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements ead "fortune, prosperity, riches" and ræd "advice, counsel," hence "wealthy and wise."
Eade - Middle English pet form of Hebrew Adam, meaning "earth" or "red."
Earnestine - Feminine form of English Earnest, meaning "battle (to the death), serious business."
Eadgyth - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Eadgyð, meaning "rich battle."
Ealdred - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Ealdræd, meaning "old advisor."
Ealdwine - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements eald "ancient, old," and wine "friend," hence "old friend."
Eadgar - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Eádgár, meaning "rich spear." 
Eadmær - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements ead "happiness, prosperity, riches," and mær "famous, renowned," hence "rich and famous."
Ealdræd - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements eald, "ancient, old," and ræd "counsel," hence "old advisor."
Eamon - Anglicized form of Irish GaelicÉamon, meaning "protector of prosperity."
Easter - English unisex name derived from the holiday name "Easter," which is related to Old English Eosturmónaþ/Eastermónaþ, meaning "April."

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