WhatName

Scottish names. Scottish male and female names

Adaire - Scottish surname derived from the Irish place name Athdare, composed of the elements ath "a ford" and dare (from darach), hence "the ford of the oaks." Click here to read a tradition concerning the origin of the surname.
Ailbeart - Scottish Gaelic form of English Albert, meaning "bright nobility."
Ailbert - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Ailbeart, meaning "bright nobility."
Aindrea - Scottish Gaelic form of Greek Andreas, meaning "man; warrior."
Ainsley - Scottish habitational surname transferred to unisex forename use, composed of the Old English elements ansetl "hermitage" and leah "meadow, pasture," hence "hermitage meadow."
Alaisdair - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Alaistair, meaning "defender of mankind."
Alaistair - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Alastair, meaning "defender of mankind."
Alaister - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Alastair, meaning "defender of mankind."
Alastair - Scottish Gaelic form of Latin Alexandrus, meaning "defender of mankind."
Alasteir - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Alastair, meaning "defender of mankind."
Alec -   Short form of English Alexander, meaning "defender of mankind."
Alestair - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Alastair, meaning "defender of mankind."
Alistair - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Alastair, meaning "defender of mankind."
Amhlaibh - Scottish Gaelic form of Scandinavian Anlaf (O.N. Ánleifr), meaning "heir of the ancestors."
Aodh - Modern Irish and Scottish Gaelic form of Old Gaelic Áed, meaning "fire." In Celtic mythology, this is the name of a sun god. 
Athol - Scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, derived from the name of a district of Perthshire, Scotland, composed of the Gaelic elements ath "ford" and al "rock, stone," hence "ford of the rock; rock-ford." 
Balfour - Scottish surname transferred to forename use, composed of the Gaelic elements bail "farm, house, village," and p�ir "grass, pasture," hence "farm pasture; grazing land."
Barclay - Scottish form of Old English Berkeley, meaning "birch tree meadow." 
Beathan - Scottish name derived from Gaelic beatha, meaning "life."
Benneit - Scottish Gaelic form of Greek Benediktos, meaning "blessed." 
Bhaltair - Scottish Gaelic form of Old High German Walthere, meaning "ruler of the army." 
Bryce - Scottish form of Welsh Brychan, meaning "pied, spotted, speckled." 
Cailean - Scottish Gaelic name meaning "whelp; young pup."
Callum - Variant spelling of Scottish Calum, meaning "dove."
Calum - Scottish form of Latin Columba, meaning "dove."
Cam -   Short form of Scottish unisex Cameron ("crooked nose"), and other names beginning with Cam-.
Campbell - Scottish surname transferred to forename use, composed of the Gaelic elements cam "bent, crooked" and beul "mouth," hence "crooked mouth."
Caoidhean - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Caointean, meaning "fifth."
Caointean - Scottish Gaelic form of Old French Quentin, meaning "fifth."
Carbrey - Anglicized form of Gaelic Cairbre, meaning "charioteer." In Irish and Scottish use.
Ceanntighern - Scottish Gaelic name composed of the elements ceann "head" and tigern "lord," hence "head lord."
Cliamain - Scottish Gaelic form of Latin Clementius, meaning "gentle and merciful."
Clyde - English name derived from the name of the Scottish river Cledwyn, of uncertain origin, but probably having a similar etymology to Irish Clodagh, meaning "muddy."
Columb - Scottish form of Latin Columba, meaning "dove."
Comhnall - Scottish form of Irish Gaelic Conall, meaning "hound of valor."
Cormag - Scottish form of Irish Gaelic Cormac, meaning "son of defilement."
Cuddy - Pet form of Scottish Cuithbeart, meaning "bright fame." This name was also used as a byname for a donkey.
Cuithbeart - Scottish Gaelic form of Anglo-Saxon Cuthbeorht, meaning "bright fame." 
Cuithbrig - Scottish Gaelic form of Anglo-Saxon Cuthbeorht, meaning "bright fame." 
Dabhaidh - Scottish Gaelic form of Hebrew David, meaning "beloved."
Daividh - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Dàibhidh, meaning "beloved." 
Dand - Pet form of Scottish Aindrea, meaning "man; warrior."
Davey -   English pet form of Hebrew David, meaning "beloved."
Davie -   English pet form of Hebrew David, meaning "beloved."
Davy -   English pet form of Hebrew David, meaning "beloved."
Dermid - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Diarmad, meaning "without envy."
Diarmad - Scottish Gaelic form of Irish Gaelic Diarmaid, meaning "without envy."
Dolaidh - Pet form of Scottish Gaelic Domhnall, meaning "world ruler." 
Domhnall - Scottish Gaelic name composed of the Celtic elements dubno "world" and val "rule," hence "world ruler."
Donaidh - Pet form of Scottish Gaelic Domhnall, meaning "world ruler." Equivalent to English Donnie.
Drummond - Scottish habitational surname transferred to forename use, derived from Gaelic druim, meaning "ridge."
Dugald - Variant form of Scottish Dùghall, meaning "black stranger."
Eachann - Scottish Gaelic name composed of the elements each "horse" and donn "brown," hence "brown horse." Hector is an Anglicized form.
Eallair - Scottish contracted form of Gaelic Ceallair, meaning "superior of a church cell."
Eanraig - Scottish Gaelic form of English Henry, meaning "home-ruler."
Eideard - Scottish Gaelic form of English Edward, meaning "guardian of prosperity."
Ellar - Modern form of Scottish Eallair, meaning "superior of a church cell."
Erroll - Variant spelling of Scottish Errol, possibly meaning "to wander."
Eudard - Dialectal variant of Scottish Gaelic Eideard, meaning "guardian of prosperity."
Eumann - Scottish Gaelic form of English Edmund, meaning "protector of prosperity."
Ewart - Scottish surname transferred to forename use, possibly originally an Anglo-Norman form of English Edward, meaning "guardian of prosperity."
Fib - Scottish (Pictish) name meaning "poet." In legend, this is the name of a Pictish hero after whom the kingdom of Fib (later known as Fife) was named.
Fife - Scottish surname transferred to forename use, meaning "from Fife," a place said to have gotten its name from the legendary Pictish hero Fib.
Filib - Scottish Gaelic form of French Philippe, meaning "lover of horses."
Foirtchern - Irish form of English Vortigern, possibly meaning "high lord" or "overlord." In use by the Scottish.
Forbes - Scottish surname transferred to forename use, derived from the Gaelic word forba, meaning "district, field." 
Frang - Scottish Gaelic form of Latin Franciscus, meaning "French."
Frangan - Pet form of Scottish Gaelic Frang, meaning "French."
Fraser - French surname transferred to forename use, of Norman origin, but the derivation has been lost due to corruption of form by association with the French word fraise, meaning "strawberry." In English and Scottish use.
Fyfe - Variant spelling of Scottish Fife, meaning "from Fife."
Glen - Scottish name derived from the word gleann, meaning "valley."
Graeme - Variant spelling of Scottish Graham, meaning "gravel home."
Grahame - Variant spelling of Scottish Graham, meaning "gravel home."
Greer - Scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, derived from a contracted form of Gregor, meaning "watchful; vigilant."
Greg - Short form of English Gregory, and Scottish Gregor, both meaning "watchful; vigilant."
Gregg - Short form of English Gregory, and Scottish Gregor, meaning "watchful; vigilant."
Gregor - Scottish form of Latin Gregorius, meaning "watchful; vigilant."
Greig - Pet form of Scottish Gregor, meaning "watchful; vigilant."
Griogair - Scottish Gaelic form of Latin Gregorius, meaning "watchful; vigilant."
Henderson - Scottish surname transferred to forename use, meaning "son of Hendry."
Hendry - Scottish form of Latin Henricus, meaning "home-ruler."
Huchon - Medieval Scottish form of French Hugon, meaning "heart," "mind," or "spirit."
Iagan - Scottish form of Irish Gaelic Aodhagán, meaning "tiny little fire."
Iain - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Ian, meaning "God is gracious."
Ian - Scottish Gaelic form of Greek Ioannes (English John), meaning "God is gracious."
Innis - Scottish unisex name derived from Gaelic inis, meaning "island."
Irvine - Scottish surname transferred to English forename use, from the Celtic name of a river, composed of the Welsh elements ir/yr "fresh, green" and afon "water," hence "fresh water" or "green water."
Islay - Scottish name derived from the name of the island known as the "Queen of the Hebrides," meaning "island" in Gaelic.
Jaimie - Variant spelling of English Jamie, meaning "supplanter." Compare with masculine Jaimie.
Jamey - Variant spelling of English/Scottish Jamie, meaning "supplanter."
Jamie - Feminine form of English James, meaning "supplanter." Compare with masculine Jamie.
Jamieson - English and Scottish patronymic surname transferred to forename use, meaning "son of Jamie."
Jamison - Variant spelling of English/Scottish Jamieson, meaning "son of Jamie."
Jockie - Pet form of Scottish Jock, meaning "God is gracious."
Jocky - Variant spelling of Scottish Jockie, meaning "God is gracious."
Kester - Medieval Scottish form of Latin Crescentius, meaning "to spring up, grow, thrive."
Labhrainn - Scottish Gaelic form of Latin Laurentius, meaning "of Laurentum."
Lachie - Pet form of Scottish Gaelic Lachlann, meaning "lake-land."
Lachlann - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Lochlann, meaning "lake-land."
Laird - Scottish name meaning "landowner."
Lamont - Scottish surname transferred to English forename use, from the medieval Swedish personal name Lagman, meaning "lawman."
Lauchlan - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Lachlan, meaning "lake-land."
Leith - Scottish surname transferred to forename use, derived from the name of a river of Celtic origin, meaning "flowing water."
Lennox - Scottish surname transferred to forename use, meaning "place of elms." 
Lenox - Variant spelling of Scottish Lennox, meaning "place of elms." 
Lochlainn - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Lochlann, meaning "lake-land."
Lochlann - Scottish Gaelic name, originally used to refer to someone from Norway, composed of the elements loch "lake" and lann "land," hence "lake-land."
Lockie - Pet form of Scottish Lùcas, meaning "from Lucania." 
Logan - Scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from the name of a place in Ayrshire, meaning "hollow, lowland." 
Lyall - Scottish surname transferred to unisex forename use, from the Old Norse personal name Liulfr, possibly meaning "shield wolf."
Maitland - English and Scottish surname transferred to forename use, derived from a byname for an ungracious person, from Anglo-Norman French maltalent/mautalent, meaning "bad tempered." 
Maoilios - Scottish Gaelic name meaning "servant of Jesus." 
Max - English short form of both Latin Maximilian "the greatest rival" and Scottish Maxwell "the stream of Mack." 
Maxwell - Scottish surname transferred to forename use, derived from the place name Maxwell, meaning "the stream of Mack." 
Melville - Scottish surname of Norman French origin, transferred to English forename use, from the name of various places in Normandy called Malleville, meaning "bad settlement."
Micheil - Scottish Gaelic form of Greek Michaēl, meaning "who is like God?"
Monroe - Scottish surname transferred to forename use, derived from Irish Munro, meaning "from the mount on the river Roe," in Ireland, where the family came from. 
Moray - Scottish form of English Murray, meaning "sea warrior."
Muicheachtach - Scottish Gaelic name composed of the elements muir "sea" and ceartach "ruler, skilled," hence "skilled seaman." 
Muir - Short form of Scottish Gaelic Muireach ("sea warrior"), and other names beginning with Muir-, from muir, meaning "sea." 
Muircheartach - Scottish Gaelic name composed of the elements muir "sea" and ceardach "skilled," hence "skilled seaman."
Muireach - Modern contracted form of Scottish Gaelic Muiredach, meaning "sea warrior."
Muireadhach - Scottish Gaelic name composed of the elements muir "sea" and cath "battle," hence "sea warrior."
Muiredach - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Muireadhach, meaning "sea warrior."
Muiriartach - Modern form of Scottish Gaelic Muicheachtach, meaning "skilled seaman."
Munga - Older form of Scottish Mungo, possibly meaning "dearest friend."
Mungo - Old Scottish pet name derived from Brythonic my-nghu, meaning "dear one." It was recorded in Latin in the 6th century as carissimus amicus, meaning "dearest friend." 
Murchadh - Scottish Gaelic name composed of the elements muir "sea" and cath "battle," hence "sea warrior."
Neacal - Scottish Gaelic form of Greek Nikolaos, meaning "victor of the people."
Nichol - Variant spelling of Scottish Nicol, meaning "victor of the people."
Nicol - Scottish form of Latin Nicolaus, meaning "victor of the people."
Olghar - Scottish Gaelic form of French Olivier, probably meaning "elf army."
Rabbie - Pet form of Scottish Raibeart, meaning "bright fame."
Raibeart - Scottish Gaelic form of Norman French Robert, meaning "bright fame."
Raibert - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Raibeart, meaning "bright fame."
Ramsay - Scottish surname transferred to forename use, from a place name composed of the Old English elements hramsa "wild garlic" and eg "island," hence "wild-garlic island."
Ramsey - Variant spelling of Scottish Ramsay, meaning "wild-garlic island."
Ranulf -   Scottish form of Old Norse Randulfr, meaning "shield-wolf."
Ranulph - Variant spelling of Scottish Ranulf, meaning "shield-wolf."
Ronnie - English pet form of Latin Veronica, meaning "bringer of victory." Compare with masculine Ronnie. 
Ross - Scottish surname transferred to forename use, derived from the Gaelic word ros, meaning "headland, promontory."
Ruairí - Variant spelling of Irish Ruaidhrí, meaning "red king."
Ruairidh - Scottish equivalent of Irish Gaelic Ruaidhrí, meaning "red king."
Ruaraidh - Variant spelling of Scottish Ruairidh, meaning "red king."
Ruaridh - Variant spelling of Scottish Ruairidh, meaning "red king."
Ruiseart - Scottish Gaelic form of Old High German Ricohard, meaning "powerful ruler."
Sachairi - Scottish form of Greek Zacharias, meaning "whom Jehovah remembered."
Sawney - Pet form of Scottish Gaelic Alaisdair, meaning "defender of mankind."
Seoc - Scottish Gaelic form of French Jacques (English Jack), meaning "God is gracious."
Seumas -  Scottish Gaelic form of Latin Jacomus, meaning "supplanter."
Sheumais - Older form of Scottish Gaelic Seumas, meaning "supplanter."
Shug - Pet form of Medieval Scottish Huchon, meaning "heart," "mind," or "spirit."
Simidh - Scottish Gaelic form of Greek Symeon, meaning "hearkening."
Sinclair - Scottish surname transferred to forename use, from a Norman baronial place name in France called "Saint-Clair."
Somerled - Scottish Gaelic form of Old Norse Sumarlíðr, meaning "summer traveler."
Steafan - Scottish Gaelic form of French Stéphane, meaning "crown."
Steaphan - Scottish Gaelic form of French Stéphane, meaning "crown."
Steenie - Pet form of Scottish Steaphan, meaning "crown."
Stu - English and Scottish short form of French Stuart, meaning "house guard; steward."
Stuart - French form of English Stewart, meaning "house guard; steward." In use by the English and Scottish.
Suibhne - Irish and Scottish Gaelic name meaning "well-going." 
Summerlad - Variant spelling of Scottish Somerled, meaning "summer traveler."
Tadg - Variant spelling of Irish/Scottish Gaelic Tadhg, meaning "poet."
Tadhg - Irish and Scottish Gaelic name meaning "poet."
Tasgall - Scottish Gaelic form of Old Norse Ásketill, meaning "divine kettle."
Uailean - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Vailean, meaning "healthy, strong."
Ualan - Variant spelling of Scottish Gaelic Valan, meaning "healthy, strong."
Uilleam - Scottish Gaelic form of German Wilhelm, meaning "will-helmet."
Vailean - Scottish Gaelic form of Latin Valentinus, meaning "healthy, strong."
Valan - Scottish Gaelic form of Latin Valentinus, meaning "healthy, strong."
Willie -   Pet form of English William, meaning "will-helmet."
Wylie - Irish and Scottish equivalent of English Willy, meaning "will-helmet."

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