WhatName

Anglo_saxon names. Anglo_saxon male and female names

Acca - In Roman mythology, this is part of the name of the wife of Faustulus, Acca Larentia, who saved the infants Romulus and Remus from drowning in the Tiber river. She was also called lupa, "she-wolf," because of her immoral character, and this is probably what started the tradition that the twins were suckled by a wolf. In another version, she is the mother of the Lares, the dead progenitors of the Roman people.
Aylmer -  English surname transferred to forename use, derived from a contracted form of Athelmare, meaning "nobly famous."
Baldric - Old High German name composed of the elements bald "bold, brave" and ric "power, rule," hence "bold ruler."
Barbary - Medieval English form of Greek Barbara, meaning "foreign; strange."
Beorhthere - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements beorht "bright" and here "army," hence "bright army."
Beorhtraed - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements beorht "bright" and ræd "counsel," hence "bright counsel."
Beorhtwulf - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements beorht "bright" and wulf "wolf," hence "bright wolf."
Beornheard - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements beorn "bear" and heard "brave, hardy," hence "bold as a bear."
Beowulf - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements beo "bee" and wulf "wolf," hence "bee-wolf," i.e. "a bear." From the Old English epic poem of the same name about a Germanic hero named Beowulf, who travels to Denmark to help defeat a monster named Grendel. 
Berhtulf - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements berht "bright" and wulf "wolf," hence "bright wolf."
Caedmon - This is the name of an Anglo-Saxon poet mentioned by Bede, perhaps composed of caed "battle" and man "place, spot," hence "place of battle."
Canute - Variant spelling of Latin Canutte, meaning "knot."
Ceadda - Anglo-Saxon name, possibly derived from Celtic cad, meaning "battle."
Cedric - English name coined by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his novel Ivanhoe, thought to possibly be a variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Cerdic, meaning "war chief." 
Cena - Anglo-Saxon name derived from the Old English word cene, meaning "brave, keen."
Ceneric - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements cene "keen, brave" and ric "power," hence "brave/keen power."
Cenhelm - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements cene "brave, keen" and helm "helmet, protection," hence "brave/keen helmet."
Cenric - Middle English form of Anglo-Saxon Ceneric, meaning "keen power."
Céolsige - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements céol "ship" and sige "victory," hence "ship-victory."
Cerdic - Anglo-Saxon name, possibly meaning "war chief."
Chad - Modern English form of Anglo-Saxon Ceadda, possibly meaning "battle."
Cuthbeorht - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements cuðe "famous, renowned," and beorht "bright," hence "bright fame."
Cuthbert - Modern English form of Anglo-Saxon Cuthbeorht, meaning "bright fame." 
Cynebeald - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements cyne "royal" and beald "bold, brave," hence "royal brave."
Cyneburga - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements cyne "royal" and burg "fortress, protection," hence "royal fortress."
Cynefrith - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Cynefrið, meaning "royal peace."
Cyneric - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements cyne "royal" and ric "power," hence "royal power."
Cyneward - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Cyneweard, meaning "royal guard."
Cyneweard - Early Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements cyne "royal" and weard "guard," hence "royal guard."
Eadburga - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements ead "fortune, riches, prosperity," and burg "fortress," hence "rich fortress."
Eadgard - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Eádgár, meaning "rich spear." 
Eadgyth - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Eadgyð, meaning "rich battle."
Eadred - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements ead "fortune, prosperity, riches" and ræd "advice, counsel," hence "wealthy and wise."
Ealdgyth - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Ealdgyð, meaning "old battle."
Ealdred - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Ealdræd, meaning "old advisor."
Ealdwine - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements eald "ancient, old," and wine "friend," hence "old friend."
Earnweald - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements earn "eagle" and weald "power, might," hence "eagle power." After the Norman invasion this name was replaced in England by German Arnwald.
Eastmund - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements east "beauty, grace" and mund "protection," hence "gracious protector."
Ebba - Pet form of Anglo-Saxon Eadburga, meaning "rich fortress."
Ecgberct - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Ecgbert, meaning "bright edge."
Ecgbert - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the elements ecg "edge, point," and bert "bright," hence "bright edge." 
Ecgbryht - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Ecgbert, meaning "bright edge."
Edmund - Middle English form of Anglo-Saxon Eadmund, meaning "protector of prosperity."
Eoforheard - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements eofor "boar" and hard "hardy, strong," hence "strong as a boar."
Eoforhild - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements eofor "boar" and hild "battle," hence "boar-battle."
Eoforwine - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements eofor "wild boar" and wine "friend," hence "boar friend."
Erna -   Anglo-Saxon name meaning "reserved, shy." 
Erwig - Anglo-Saxon form of Visigothic Euric, meaning "ever-ruler."
Esa - Finnish form of Greek Esaias, meaning "God is salvation."
Ethelbert - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Æthelbert, meaning "bright nobility."
Etheldreda - Middle English form of Anglo-Saxon Æðelþryð,meaning "noble strength."
Ethelfleda - Middle English form of Anglo-Saxon Æthelflæd, meaning "noble beauty."
Ethelhard - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Æthelhard, meaning "noble strength."
Ethelheard - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Æthelheard, meaning "noble strength." 
Ethelinda - Middle English form of Anglo-Saxon Æthelinda, meaning "noble serpent."
Ethelred - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Æthelred, meaning "noble counsel."
Ethelric - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Æthelric, meaning "noble ruler."
Ethelstan - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Æthelstan, meaning "noble stone."
Ethelwolf - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Æthelwulf, meaning "noble wolf."
Freodheric - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Frithuric, meaning "peaceful ruler."
Frithswith - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Friðuswith, meaning "peace-strong."
Frithuric - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Friþuric, meaning "peaceful ruler."
Frithuswith - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Friðuswith, meaning "peace-strong."
Garrick -   Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements ger "spear" and ric "power," hence "spear power."
Gisa -   Anglo-Saxon name meaning "gift." 
Godric - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements god "God" and ric "power, rule," hence "divine power" or "power of God."
Grendel - This is the name of a monster killed by Beowulf in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf, possibly derived from ent or ettin, meaning "scather." He is said to be a descendant of Cain, and has been described as a giant by some, a troll by others. 
Gytha - Middle English form of Anglo-Saxon Gyða, meaning "strife, war."
Herebeorht - Anglo-Saxon equivalent of Old High German Heribert, meaning "bright army." 
Hereward - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements here "army" and weard "guard," hence "army-guard."
Hereweald - Anglo-Saxon name, composed of the Old English elements here "army" and weald "power, rule," hence "army ruler." 
Hildebeorht - Anglo-Saxon equivalent of German Hildebert, meaning "battle-bright."
Hildred - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements hild "battle" and ræd "counsel," hence "battle counsel."
Hrothgar - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Hroðgar, meaning "famous spear." 
Hunfrith - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Hunfrið, meaning "giant peace."
Ida -   Norman name derived from Germanic id, meaning "work." 
Idonea - Latin form of Old Norse Iðunnr, meaning "again to love."
Kenelm - Middle English form of Anglo-Saxon Cenhelm, meaning "keen protection." 
Kenrick - Variant spelling of English Kendrick, meaning "keen power."
Leofric - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements leof "beloved, dear" and ric "power, rule," hence "beloved ruler."
Leofwine - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements leof "beloved, dear" and wine "friend," hence "dear friend."
Leola -   Anglo-Saxon name meaning "deer."
Milburga - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements milde "gentle" and burg "fortress," hence "gentle fortress."
Mildryth - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements milde "gentle" and þryð "strength," hence "gentle strength."
Muriel - Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Muireall, meaning "sea-bright."
Osbeorht - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements os "god" and beorht "bright," hence "god-bright."
Osbeorn - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements os "divinity, god" and beorn "bear," hence "divine-bear." Equivalent to Old Norse Ásbjorn.
Osmund - Anglo-Saxon equivalent of Old Norse Ásmundr, composed of the Old English elements os "god" and mund "protection," hence "divine protection." 
Osweald - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements os "god" and weald "wielder of power," hence "divine power" or "divine ruler."
Oswin - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements os "god" and win "friend," hence "divine friend" or "friend of God."
Randulf - Middle English form of Anglo-Saxon Randwulf, meaning "shield-wolf."
Raulf - Norman French contracted form of German Radulf, meaning "wise wolf."
Selwyn - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements sele "manor" and wine "friend," hence "manor-friend."
Sigebeald - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements sige "victory" and beald "brave, bold," hence "bold victory."
Sigeberht - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements sige "victory" and beorht "bright," hence "bright victory."
Sigeweard - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements sige "victory" and weard "guard, protector," hence "victory guard."
Siweard - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements se "sea" and weard "guard, protect," hence "sea-guard."
Theodbeald - Anglo-Saxon equivalent of German Theobald, meaning "people-bold."
Thunor - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Þunor, meaning "thunder."
Tiw - Anglo-Saxon form of German Tiwaz, meaning "god."
Wada - Anglo-Saxon name derived from the Old English word wadan, meaning "to go," in the sense of going forward, proceeding. This is the name of a legendary sea giant.
Wade -   English topographical surname transferred to forename use, meaning "lives near the river crossing."
Wassa - Pet form of Anglo-Saxon Waðsige "hunt-victory" and other names containing the element wað, meaning "hunt."
Wealdhere - Anglo-Saxon equivalent of German Waldheri, composed of the Old English elements weald "to rule, to wield power" and heri "army, host," hence "ruler of the army."
Wigheard - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements wig "battle, fight, war" and heard "brave, hardy, strong," hence "hardy warrior."
Wigmund - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements wig "battle, fight, war" and mund "protection," hence "fight-protection."
Wigstan - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements wig "battle, fight, war" and stan "stone," hence "battle-stone."
Wilbeorht - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements wil "desire, will" and beohrt "bright," hence "will-bright."
Wilfrid - Middle English form of Anglo-Saxon Wilfrið, meaning "desires peace."
Wilfrith - Variant spelling of Anglo-Saxon Wilfrið, meaning "desires peace."
Wilheard - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements wil "desire, will" and heard "brave, hardy, strong," hence "strong-willed."
Willard - English surname transferred to forename use, derived from the Anglo-Saxon personal name Wilheard, meaning "strong-willed." 
Wimund - Contracted form of Anglo-Saxon Wigmund, meaning "fight-protection."
Wine - Anglo-Saxon name meaning"friend." 
Winfrid - Middle English form of Anglo-Saxon Winfrið, meaning "friend of peace."
Woden - Anglo-Saxon equivalent of Old Norse Óðinn, derived from proto-Germanic *Wod-enaz-, meaning "eager, frenzied, raging." 
Wulfric - Anglo-Saxon name composed of the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and ric "power," hence "wolf power."
Wybert - Anglo-Saxon name, composed of the Old English elements wig "battle, fight, war" and beorht "bright," hence "bright battle."
Wyrtgeorn - Anglo-Saxon equivalent of Old Welsh Guorthigern, meaning "high lord" or "overlord."

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